Everything you want to know about probation

The most up-to-date data

This is the latest in my new series of compendiums of the latest data and trends in the criminal justice system. Following compendiums on prisons, sentencing, and offender equalities, this edition focuses on probation.

For the best experience, click through the visualisation at the bottom of this page, this allows you to hover over data points and see the exact data. If you can’t see the visualisation below on your device, you can find it here.

Topics covered include:

  • The type of offences people are on probation for
  • The decline of community sentences over the last decade
  • Caseload figures (including changes in different forms of supervision)
  • The offence profile of people on community supervision
  • A breakdown of the popularity of different requirements on community orders and suspended sentence orders
  • Successful completion rates (and reasons for termination) for community supervision
  • The spectacular drop in the number of full Pre-Sentence reports

I hope you find them of use and interest.

Compendium last updated 3 December 2020

Criminal Justice Trends

Click below for up-to-date interactive charts using the latest official data.

Offender equalities

A wide range of prison statistics broken down by gender, ethnicity and age.

Probation

The latest caseload figures and trends, offender profiles and court reports.

Prison

Details of individual establishments, costs, population trends and safety in custody stats.

Sentencing

Compare sentencing outcomes, lengths and reoffending rates and index offences.

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Alan Mackie of Get The Data argues that we too often overlook the importance of worker-service user relationships in successful desistance work.