Women in contact with the Criminal Justice System

All the latest Stats Research Policy Best practice

Women in the justice maze

Campaign by the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies to raise awareness of how poorly the criminal justice system meets the needs of women offenders. #FixtheMaze

How are Police Commissioners tackling women’s offending?

The multiple needs faced by women in contact with the criminal justice system mean that it is the responsibility of a range of agencies to work together for a more effective approach. PCCs can provide the leadership to ensure a co-ordinated approach to women’s offending.

Why do women get sent to prison?

Quite what so many short sentences (with prisoners spending a maximum of 13 weeks inside) achieve, given the disruption to the lives of women and their children, is very unclear to me.

Effective interventions for women offenders

It is surprising that in 2015, there is almost no British research of sufficient high quality to inform best practice in reducing women’s offending. There is a particular need to develop an effective evidence base around what works in helping women to desist from violent crime.

Preventing the unnecessary criminalisation of women

Far too many women are brought into the justice system unnecessarily. Thousands of women are inappropriately criminalised every year to the detriment of individuals, families and communities. For many women it is their repeated victimisation which has led to involvement in the justice system

Women’s prisons are improving

It is notable that women’s prisons, although facing all the problems of having to operate within a male focused system, have largely succeeded in improving the service they provide when conditions in men’s prisons have deteriorated so far, so quickly.

Coaching behind bars

The prison takes away many choices and coaching give some fundamental ones back, along with hope. Not the blind hope that the whole world will miraculously change, but that they can change themselves and parts of the world around them. Some explicitly choose to become survivors not victims.

Women’s Centres cut reoffending

The official conclusion of the JDL analysis is that: “individuals who received support provided by Women’s Centres throughout England experienced a reduction in re‐ offending of between 1 and 9 percentage points.” This is a very positive finding and it is to be hoped that the JDL repeats this analysis in the near future with a much bigger cohort and more sophisticated matching method.