Jon Collins of the Police Foundation says the jury is still out on payment by results

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Jon Collins is Deputy Director of the Police Foundation and has written extensively on payment by results when he was at the Criminal Justice Alliance.

In the latest in this PbR video interview series, he speculates on a range of issues including whether Police and Crime Commissioners will pursue a PbR approach when they take up office this November.

You can follow Jon on Twitter at @jonbcollins

What do you think of Jon’s views?

Will providers “budget for failure” and risk dropping the quality of service provided?

Will PbR focus attention on achieving results?

 

Please comment below.

 

You can see all the video interviews in this series with a wide range of viewpoints pro and con PbR from different perspectives here.

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