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Russell Webster

Russell Webster

Criminal Justice & substance misuse expert and author of this blog.

The real cost of the war on drugs

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In 2011, fewer than half of all violent crimes in the USA found any resolution. An alarming 59% of rape cases and 36.2% of murders in the United States are never solved. Why are so many violent criminals walking free? Professor Alex Kreit suggests that U.S. police forces should stop focusing so much of their resources on enforcing drug laws...

Why are so many violent criminals walking free?

In 2011, fewer than half of all violent crimes in the USA found any resolution.

An alarming 59% of rape cases and 36.2% of murders in the United States are never solved.

Why are so many violent criminals walking free?

Professor Alex Kreit suggests that U.S. police forces should stop focusing so much of their resources on enforcing drug laws in this high quality motion infographic:

 

You can follow Professor Kreit at @alexkreit on Twitter.

 

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One Response

  1. Kreit makes a good point. A tremendous amount of money and resources are being spent on something that essentially is not a crime but as Lysander Spooner put it a vice.

    But the problem goes even further than that. By criminalizing drugs, the government ensures that those selling the product are the ones that are willing to assume the risks that the government attached to said activity. Now that alcohol is legal, you don’t see liquor store owners shooting one another using tommy guns, but during the prohibition era the people who took over the alcohol business were violent criminals.

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