Privatisation

Comparing the costs of public and private prisons

Once Michael Gove publishes more details of the nine new prisons he intends to build and we know for sure that they will be PFI, we can start testing out the Chancellor’s claim that the prison estate will be £80 million a year cheaper to run.

The Modern Bounty Hunter

As the English and Welsh probation service is currently being privatised via the Government’s Transforming Rehabilitation initiative, here is a quick reminder of just how much the criminal justice system is privatised in other parts of the world.

Crime pays for private prisons

The infographic below shows what big business private prisons have become in the USA. As you can see, the number of private prisons has grown exponentially in the last 20 years.

Creating effective Police partnerships

It should be remembered that “Policing for a Better Britain” was commissioned by the Labour Party and it is, therefore, no surprise to see the issue of privatisation tackled head-on. The report is not against privatisation but recommends that outsourcing should only be considered by reference to five key principles:

The Ten Commandments of Payment by Results

It’s getting increasingly difficult to have a productive debate about payment by results. For many people, PbR is merely shorthand for the privatisation or even a backdoor way of funneling public funds into multinational companies. For others, it is a potentially exciting approach to commissioning public services which can drive innovation and improved performance. But whether you love PbR or hate it, the main reason why it’s difficult to have a meaningful discussion is the lack of any evidence base. This post is my take on 10 critical success factors for PbR.

The curious case of the crime commissioner candidate

00000Mervyn Barrett is an independent candidate to be Lincolnshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner (the election is on 15 November 2012). Highly regarded for his background in crime prevention, commentators wondered where he was getting the money to run such a high-profile and expensive campaign. On Saturday (20th October), his entire campaign team resigned ahead of a story in Sunday’s Telegraph saying that his campaign “was being secretly backed by American neo-conservative lobbyists and companies pushing …

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Involving front-line staff in the payment by results debate

00000There’s plenty of discussion about payment by results both online and at conferences and seminars. But one aspect that is rarely mentioned is how to encourage staff to engage in the debate and get them to at least consider the potential of the PbR approach. Many front-line workers (@TheCustodySgt has written a great post on who exactly front line staff are) in the statutory and voluntary sectors instinctively respond to all mentions of PbR as if it is …

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What’s the future for PbR?

00000What does the future hold for payment by results initiatives in 2012? PbR is fast becoming a key component of the Coalition Government project, generating increasing amounts of media coverage. The payments by results scheme to tackle “problem families”  received hundreds of column inches, although most clued-up commentators were quick to argue that the headline £200 million funding was not all new money. In terms of criminal justice PbR schemes, with which this blog is …

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PbR – a healthy proposition?

00000Last week I posted apoll to try to gauge attitudes to payment by results by those sufficiently interested in the subject to read this Blog. For reasons that I go into in a comment on that post, the poll bombed. Most people either weren’t interested or were very wary about voicing an opinion, even in an anonymised format. I offered five possible answers to the poll question ‘What do you think of PbR?’: A great opportunity …

PbR – a healthy proposition?Read More »

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