Police Social Media

Police countdown to Christmas with #Badvent calendars

ottinghamshire Police – @nottspolice – went in a different direction entirely. Their online advent calendar replaces the daily chocolate with the picture of a “most wanted” local criminal. Originally termed the #Badvent Calendar, it was renamed the “Festive Crime Calendar”. It’s still a strong contender for my hashtag of the year award.

Report back on 2nd Global Police Tweetathon #poltwt

On 1 November over 12 thousand tweeters in 68 countries got involved in the 2nd Global Police Tweetathon organised by Lauri Stevens (@lawscomm) over at ConnectedCops. Bright Planet harvested all the data and have produced the interactive infographic below. Have fun hovering over the countries and other sections to get more information.

Second global police Tweetathon #poltwt

The 1st global police Tweetathon was a great success. The sequel launches on 1 November 2013 for 24 hours. Get involved and see how police forces from around the world use Twitter to engage with their local communities. #poltwt

Get ready for Global Police Tweetathon – Part 2

Global Police Tweetathon Part 2 takes place 1 November 2013. The first tweetathon took place in March 2013; the hashtag #poltwt trended from New Zealand west to Australia, across Europe and then from the east coast of North America in a wave across to the west coast. There were 48,482 tweets in 23 different languages – reaching over 11 million people. Here’s how to get involved…

Police pin down criminals

Pinterest is the latest social media platform that police services all over the world have started using for a wide range of reasons. To find wanted criminals and missing persons. To locate the owners of stolen property. And much more beyond…

How cops used Twitter to catch a fish like Wanda

Finally Friday is an occasional series of posts taking a light-hearted look at how social media and law enforcement interact in unintended ways. I’ve posted before about criminals at large taunting police on social media, with varying degrees of success. The case of Wanda Lee Ann Podgurski is a worthy addition to the catologue. Ms Podgurski is a serial fraudster who was convicted in January 2013 of dishonestly acquiring $650,000 from fake insurance and disability claims. Wanda set up a Twitter account and followed just one other tweeter – San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis…

She promptly went on the run.

Police & Twitter, Spanish Style

Did you know that the Spanish national police force Twitter account @policia has over half a million followers? Only the FBI has more. Police display the national Twitter handle on their uniforms and their patrol cars. Spanish Police use Twitter differently from British Police – the focus is not on engaging with individual members of the public but on gathering intelligence – frequently to target drug dealers.

Police, Twitter and major incidents

Any major incident provokes a firestorm of reaction on Twitter and other social media outlets. In the wake of events such as the terrorist killing of Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich what should the police be doing online. Amongst the general noise and bot-generated confusion, there are opportunities to keep the public reliably informed and gather some key intelligence.

Police Inspector @SimonJGuilfoyle says Twitter proves men can multi-task

Police Inspector @SimonJGuilfoyle says Twitter proves men can multi-task. One thing I particularly like about twitter is that it affords the previously unheard of opportunity to interact with people at all levels in police forces, as well as those from totally different backgrounds, locations and viewpoints. I’ve had some great debates with a range of extremely interesting people, without the formalities inherent in hierarchies or social constructs.

Police and public combine on social media to find missing persons

Social media – and Twitter in particular – is becoming the mainstream way of locating missing people. I was slightly surprised when I reviewed five UK police Facebook pages recently and found that a third of the most popular posts related to missing persons. It’s no surprise that police use social media for this purpose though. I’ve come across two successful outcomes in the last month.

First Global Police Tweetathon

Read all about the first global police tweetathon and follow almost 200 police forces tweeting live from around the world. You can see the #POLTWT hashtag stream live on the post.

Police Social media engages communities and cuts costs

00000This is the ninth in a series of posts based on the recent COMPOSITE report on police use of social media across Europe. Using social media to cut the cost of communication The COMPOSITE study was undertaken over the last two years where most of Europe’s police forces were having to cope with reduced budgets owing to the global recession. A number of senior police officers interviewed for the study stated that although one of the …

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Social media is critical to police IT systems dealing with newsworthy issues

00000This is the eighth in a series of posts based on the recent COMPOSITE report on police use of social media across Europe.   Hold the front page Crime has always been front page news. Always sold newspapers. The advent of TV – remember the real time coverage of OJ Simpson’s arrest – accelerated the speed with which news spread: And social media has ensured that bad news goes global in minutes – as anyone following …

Social media is critical to police IT systems dealing with newsworthy issuesRead More »

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