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On Probation

Straw Man: The Ministry of Justice’s payment by results mechanism

The Ministry of Justice procurement team yesterday published its proposed payment mechanism for the new reducing reoffending contracts and invited feedback. There are three elements to the payment mechanism: Fee for service; Payment by results and Penalties for underperformance.

On Probation

Who is going to lead the rehabilitation revolution?

I just got back from an interesting roundtable discussion on payment by results and re-offending convened by IPPR. I cam away with two main thoughts. Is there really no alternative to the MoJ’s cumbersome cohort approach to calculating PbR? And who is going to provide on the ground leadership for the rehabilitation revolution in a centrally commissioned model with a much reduced probation service?

Payment by Results

Will the MoJ data lab do us justice?

The new MoJ data lab promises small voluntary organisations access to information about their effectiveness – for free. It could be invaluable for organisations looking to win reducing re-offending contracts under the new payment by results framework. But how will it work in practice?

Payment by Results

Payment by results – the devil really is in the detail

PbR is simple in theory…

Payment by results is quite a straightforward concept. Its chief attraction lies in its ability to incentivise providers to deliver exactly what a commissioner wants. For example, any PbR contract concerned with reducing reoffending should ensure that organisations receive the biggest payments when they succeed in getting prolific offenders to give up crime. This saves the commissioner – the Ministry of Justice – and the country money and is to the benefit of everyone in society.
However, getting the contract right in practice is proving rather more challenging – indeed, I’ve yet to go to a PbR event where at least one speaker hasn’t said: “The devil is in the detail.”

Payment by Results

Is payment by results rocket science?

12 things I learnt from the Policy Exchange PbR Event Policy Exchange hosted a payment by results event on Monday (4 March 2013) to follow

Digital Engagement

Ever thought of becoming a curation officer?

The first episode of the BBC’s new drama about the probation service, Public Enemies, airs tonight. Last week I blogged about how this rare prime time

Digital Engagement

The probation service: public friend

The BBC airs its new three-part drama, Public Enemies, about the relationship between a probation officer and a newly released murderer next Tuesday – Thursday

Payment by Results

Prison, Party Politics and PbR

Sometimes one person stands up against a revolution. Thirty years ago, on 23 February 1981, 200 armed officers of the Civil Guard burst into the

Payment by Results

What are social impact bonds? Or: Show me the money

Given the current state of the economy and scale of the deficit, it is clear that there is likely to be a continued high level of interest in Private Finance Initiatives which is essentially what Social Impact Bonds are. At one level, those of us trying to tackle entrenched social problems like drug-related offending are not too concerned with the source of funding, we just want someone to ‘show me the money’.

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