MoJ

New crackdown on corporate economic crime

The MoJ announces a new crackdown on corporate economic crime and puts out a call for evidence to help deliberations on whether new legislation is needed.

Who are the new team at the Moj?

Overall, this is a young and inexperienced ministerial team under the leadership of a young and inexperienced Justice Secretary. We will have to wait and see whether this means they can bring a fresh perspective or are vulnerable to being out-manoeuvred by vested interests.

If Jim Brown were Justice Secretary

In times of austerity it becomes more important than ever to acknowledge that safe and decent prisons only come about by listening to staff and inmates. I would seek to dismantle the present MoJ command and control structure and return to a position where Governors have authority to innovate and find local solutions that can improve each regime as they see fit.

MoJ vows to do more for victims

Perhaps the most concrete of the commitments in this document is the plan to consult on a new compensation system which would mean that victims received compensation on conviction, rather than having to wait for months and years “as and when the offender is able to pay.”

Latest probation reoffending rates – November 2013

Last week the MoJ published the latest local adult re-offending rates for the year ending on 30 June 2013. These figures will be scrutinised more closely than ever given the upcoming privatisation of the probation service via the government’s Transforming Rehabilitation project.

Modelling cohorts for Transforming Rehabilitation

Last week the MoJ published modelled data for the 6 years from 2005 to 2010, showing the number of offenders in each PbR cohort and the 1-year re-offending rates among those offenders. The report provides an historical picture of probation performance in reducing reoffending aimed at those organisations interested in winning the new probation contracts. It presents performance on a Contract Package Area, rather than Probation Trust, basis and it looks specifically at the group of offenders for whom the new Community Rehabilitation Companies will be responsible.

How is the justice data lab doing?

The purpose of the Justice Data Lab was to make it possible for small voluntary organisations to find out if their work with offenders made a difference to reoffending rates. It was launched as part of the Transforming Rehabilitation project as a way of government, commissioners and Prime providers having a way of comparing the impact of different providers delivering a range of interventions. Despite the strong publicity surrounding the launch of the Data Lab,

Principles of Competition for Transforming Rehabilitation

When the MoJ lit the fuse on the Transforming Rehabilitation procurement process last week, it also published a “Principles of Competition” document. The document is divided into two parts: Competition Fairness and Market Management…

10 things TOM taught me about Transforming Rehabilitation

When the MoJ launched the competition for the outsourced components of the probation service on 19 September 2013, they issued a number of accompanying documents. Perhaps the most important was the Target Operating Model (TOM) which explains how the new system, with the current probation trusts split into a National Probation Service (NPS) and 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies, will operate in practice. TOM is 64 pages long and gives a very detailed description of the current MoJ vision of how reducing reoffending will work from 2015 onwards…

The evidence on reducing reoffending

00000What works? One of the positive side-effects of the Transforming Rehabilitation project (launched in earnest yesterday) has been the debate it has provoked about what works in reducing reoffending. The MoJ has invested considerable effort in trying to ensure that this debate is underpinned by at least some evidence. Their first initiative was the launch of the Justice Data Lab which enables small voluntary sector providers to compare the reoffending (measured by reconvictions) of their …

The evidence on reducing reoffendingRead More »

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