Freakonomics

Arrested development: Why individual PbR will not work

000 Saturday’s newspapers sent shockwaves through all ranks of police officers who are waiting for Tom Winsor’s review of pay and conditions to be published. The Telegraph announced: “Police could be given performance-related pay for first time” While the Star went with: “Cops collar cash” It’s not sure how much credence we should give to these reports, but the Telegraph and Star do make substantially similar claims: “cash incentives for high-performing police officers who can …

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PbR needs emergency measures

00000 One of the key arguments in favour of a payment by results approach to commissioning is that the focus on outcomes allows for flexibility and innovation and radical change in how we approach such entrenched social problems as crime and drug misuse. At the moment, the various PbR pilot schemes are more about consolidating and expanding on best practice, rather than trying new approaches. The focus on outcomes  is great for driving commitment and …

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PbR Freakonomics or Prison-Probation Collaboretition

00000The authors of Freakonomics keep me consistently entertained with their books and Blog posts about the way people, in all walks of life, respond to incentives – commonly in unpredictable ways, frequently with unintended consequences. Their latest book, SuperFreakonomics, covers everything from why drunk walking is more dangerous than drunk driving to why suicide bombers should buy life insurance and I recommend it unreservedly for an entertaining, and thought-provoking read. I’m particularly drawn to these …

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