All you need to know about sentencing

What sentences do our courts pass? What do people do to get sentence to custody, and how long do they get?

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Following the interest in my recent post with a range of up-to-date information on prisons (which you can see here), I have been trawling the MoJ statistical bulletins to analyse the latest trends around sentencing.

For the best experience, click through the visualisation at the bottom of this page, this allows you to hover over data points and see the exact data. If you can’t see the visualisation below on your device, you can find it here.

If you don’t have the time or inclination to do that. I’ve reproduced the charts as graphics below.

I hope you find them of use and interest.

As usual, thanks to Andy Aitchison for kind permission to use the header image in this post. You can see Andy’s work here.

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