Ryan Campbell from RAPt on hidden costs of payment by results

Share This Post

Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on email

In this latest in a series of short video interviews on payment by results, Ryan Campbell from RAPt gives his views on PbR and drug recovery.

Ryan is open-minded about payment by results.

However he  cautions that PbR schemes must achieve much better outcomes to compensate for their sizeable hidden costs inherent in the new approach.

 

 

 

Do you think we have failed to factor in the cost to commissioners and providers of PbR commissioning?

Please comment below.

 

You can see all the video interviews in this series with a wide range of viewpoints pro and con PbR from different perspectives here.

Share This Post

Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Related posts

Payment by Results
Can payment by results improve outcomes?

The idea is that by commissioning outcomes rather than outputs, commissioners allow provider to work in any way they see fit, safe in the knowledge that if the outcomes are not achieved, they do not have to make payment. But do PbR schemes achieve better outcomes?

Commissioning
It’s time we did something about commissioning

Reform argues that the current system does not encourage innovation or quality. Whether provision is public or private it is typically a local monopoly with limited or no incentives to improve performance. Too often national and local commissioners prioritise price over effectiveness.

Commissioning
What is the state of the reducing reoffending market?

The IfG makes two very critical findings of the current commissioning of reducing reoffending services. Firstly, local commissioning is ineffective in most areas. Seondly, neither NOMS nor Probation Trusts has a systematic way of knowing whether commissioned services are effective.

Payment by Results
The 2nd Commandment of payment by results: Thy outcomes shall be few

Most payment by results pilot schemes are targeted at entrenched social problems. These problems – troubled families, long term unemployment, re-offending and drug dependency – are complex by nature. They require a coordinated response which addresses a wide range of issues. PbR funded interventions are a natural commissioning approach to tackle complex problems. However, PbR schemes quickly run into trouble when the outcomes themselves become complex.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

keep informed

One email every day at noon