Second in a series of infographics which demystify the jargon and technical terms associated with the payment by results commissioning model.

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Demystifying payment by results

This is the second in an occasional series of posts dedicated to providing an AZed of the jargon and technical terms associated with the payment by results commissioning model.

The  infographic below deals with key terms from G-L. Clicking here or on the bottom of the infographic will take you to my recently completed PbR interactive tool which is designed to help commissioners, investors and providers consider whether it might be appropriate to use PbR for a particular service. The tool asks key questions on both the rationale for using PbR and key elements of the contract such as defining and validating outcomes and guarding against common PbR problems such as “creaming and parking” and unintended consequences.

The tool provides immediate feedback, followed up by summaries of key research. Everything is evidence-based and the tool is completely free to use.

I hope you find both the infographic and the tool itself helpful.

 

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