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BOUCOIRAN, FRANCE - MARCH 16: Gold digger in France in the region of Cevennes and the department of Gard in the middle of the river called Le Gardon, march 16, 2014
Russell Webster

Russell Webster

Criminal Justice & substance misuse expert and author of this blog.

Hidden criminal justice facts

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Nuggets of interesting criminal justice information from recent MoJ FOI requests including the fact that 38 people were imprisoned for not having a TV licence.

FOI

To criminal justice enthusiasts like me, Freedom of Information requests are the gift that keeps on giving. Today’s post features a number of hidden nuggets unearthed by determined individuals and published as FOI requests by the MoJ earlier this month (August 2017).

TV Licences

  • The average fine for not having a TV licence in England last year was £170.03
  • The average fine for not having a TV licence in Wales last year was £110.06
  • 38 people were sentenced to prison for not paying a fine for not having a TV licence in England & Wales last year for an average of 25 days.

Suspended sentences

Thirty seven percent of people sentenced to immediate custody in 2015/16 had previously been given a suspended sentence.

Criminal convictions for your child missing school

The number of convictions for different provisions under the Education Act for children missing school has been on the rise.

  • In 2014, 17,175 were proceeded against with 13,097 found guilty.
  • In 2015, 21,023 were proceeded against with 15,789 found guilty.

Offences on bail

The number of offences committed on bail has been falling from 100,207 in 2013 to 75,104 in 2015

Repeat convictions for rape and sexual assault

One hundred and forty nine of the 1,400 people (10.6%) convicted of rape in 2015/16 had previously been convicted of either rape or sexual assault.

 

Blog posts in the Criminal Justice category are kindly sponsored by Get the Data which provides Social Impact Analytics to enable organisations to demonstrate their impact on society. GtD has no editorial influence on the contents of this site.

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