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THL child arrest Aug 17
Russell Webster

Russell Webster

Criminal Justice & substance misuse expert and author of this blog.

Child arrests keep falling

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The Howard League's six year campaign to cut the number of children arrested has been an outstanding success.

Child arrests down by two thirds over last six years

Finally some positive news to come out of the criminal justice system.

Surrounded by the evidence of a prison system in crisis and a failing probation service, I’m delighted to share the results of a successful long-term campaign by the Howard League for Penal Reform.

Last Monday (7 August 2017), the Howard League published figures which show that arrests of children in England and Wales have fallen by 64 per cent in the last six years.

Research by the charity has found that police made 87,525 arrests of children aged 17 and under last year, down from almost 250,000 in 2010.

The statistics underline the success of a major Howard League programme, which involves working with police forces to keep as many boys and girls as possible out of the criminal justice system.

The total number of arrests has fallen every year since the Howard League campaign began in 2010, and the impact can be seen in every police force area in the country.

Keeping children out of the criminal justice system helps prevent crime. Academic research has shown that the more contact a child has with the system, the more entrenched they are likely to become, which increases reoffending rates.

Detailed findings

Every police force in England and Wales made fewer child arrests in 2016 than in 2010. All but four forces brought down their number of arrests by more than half.

There were 703 arrests of primary-age children (10- and 11-year-olds) in 2016, a reduction of 18 per cent from the previous year.

Between 2010 and 2016, the number of children in prison in England and Wales fell by 58 per cent.

As in 2015, arrests of girls are falling at a faster rate than arrests of boys. Police recorded a 69 per cent drop in girls’ arrests between 2010 and 2016, and the number of girls in penal custody fell by 78 per cent during the same period.

The briefing states that the positive trend across police forces has been led at a national level, most notably by the National Police Chiefs’ Council, which has prioritised improvements in the policing of children.

The Howard League regularly meets and corresponds with forces and shares examples of good practice in local areas.

A good example has been set by the Chief Constable of Durham Police, who has met each of his officers individually to impress upon them a problem-solving approach rather than a reliance on arrests.

Surrey Police has given training to all custody and frontline staff, focusing on the need to reduce the number of children arrested. The force also ran an internal communications campaign to encourage people to see the “child first and the offence second”.

Thames Valley Police, like many forces, now has a system in place so that an inspector reviews every child arrest.

There is still more work to be done, however. Two forces recorded slight increases in child arrests last year and, although improvements have been made, arrests remain all too common – a child was arrested every six minutes in England and Wales in 2016.

Conclusion

Frances Crook, Chief Executive of the Howard League for Penal Reform, said:

For the sixth year running, we have seen a significant reduction in child arrests across the country. This is a tremendous achievement, and we will continue to support police forces to develop their good practice and reduce the number to an absolute minimum.

Police should be applauded for their positive approach, and the Howard League is proud to have played its part in a transformation that will make our communities safer.

By working together, we are ensuring that tens of thousands of children will have a brighter future and not be dragged into a downward spiral of crime and custody.

 

Blog posts in the Criminal Justice category are kindly sponsored by Get the Data which provides Social Impact Analytics to enable organisations to demonstrate their impact on society. GtD has no editorial influence on the contents of this site.

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