Are the PbR drug recovery pilots “a sledgehammer to crack a nut?”

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In this latest in a series of short video interviews on payment by results, Nicola Singleton from the UK Drug Policy Commission gives her views on PbR and drug recovery.

Nicola was involved in the co-design stage of the PbR drug recovery pilots and thinks that PbR has potential but questions whether it is the right vehicle for the long term, personalised outcomes that characterise recovery from drug dependency.

You can keep up with UKDPC’s work by following @UKDPC on Twitter.

 

You can see all the video interviews in this series with a wide range of viewpoints pro and con PbR from different perspectives here.

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