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Russell Webster

Russell Webster

Criminal Justice & substance misuse expert and author of this blog.

57% short term prisoners re-offend

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Last month (24 October 2014) the MoJ published a new set of statistics in readiness for the implementation of Transforming Rehabilitation – the reoffending rates for these short term prisoners. In effect these statistics provide the baseline against which reducing reoffending rates will be measured.

New statistics published

Chris Grayling, the Justice Secretary, has based much of his rationale for TR on the fact that most adult short term prisoners (those serving less than 12 months) currently receive almost no resettlement support. The Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 establishes statutory supervision for the first time for this group. This provision has yet to come into force but is expected to do so in early 2015  when new providers (see map here) take over the running of Community Rehabilitation Companies.

The new probation contracts are partly let on a payment by results basis linked to targets of reduced reoffending rates. New providers will be expecting that successfully rehabilitating short term prisoners will be the single most important component in meeting these targets.

Last month (24 October 2014) the MoJ published a new set of statistics in readiness for the implementation of Transforming Rehabilitation – the reoffending rates for these short term prisoners. In effect these statistics provide the baseline against which reducing reoffending rates will be measured.

The official statistical table is reproduced below: (as it’s so large, you might want to click on the image to enlarge it or “right click” to download it to see better if you’re on a phone or tablet)

short termers reoffending

As you can see, the current one year re-offending rate for short term prisoners released in England and Wales is 57.5%, ranging from 51% in London to 67% in the North-East.

You can also see that the 17,221 offenders who re-offended committed a large variety of offences, with many offenders committing more than one type of offence.

My table below shows the total number of offenders committing each type of offence:

short term offending type of offence

One of the key indicators of whether Transforming Rehabilitation is a success will be whether the new providers (who will be required to supervise more offenders with less funds) succeed in cutting the reoffending rate of this group of short term prisoners, many of whom are prolific petty offenders.

 

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With over 20 years’ experience in the criminal justice sector, Unilink is a world leader in probation and community corrections software applications, as well as prisoner self-service, prisoner/case management and prisoner communications. Unilink’s integrated suite of products provide a complete digital solution enabling efficient running of prisons and probation. Underpinned by biometrics it integrates seamlessly to deliver security, efficiency and value – while being proven to help rehabilitate prisoners.

2 Responses

  1. Currently probation currently does not manage under 12 month offenders, plus it is looking so far as mid 2015 before these cases will be managed if that.

  2. That’s correct, but the publication of these figures for the first time in a separate bulletin marks the first stage in developing a baseline. I expect future bulletins to compare performance against predicted reoffending rates.

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